Petition to stop concentration of flight paths; Public Meeting

Sign the petition calling on City Airport to stop plans to concentrate planes over a narrow corridor of East London

PUBLIC MEETING

 City Airport’s plans to change its flight paths

 Monday 3rd November

 7.30pm

 Wanstead Library

 Spratt Hall Road, Wanstead, London, E11 2RQ

 

Public Meeting on Flight Paths

PUBLIC MEETING

 City Airport’s plans to change its flight paths

 Monday 3rd November

 7.30pm

 Wanstead Library

 Spratt Hall Road, Wanstead, London, E11 2RQ

Buses: 66, 101, 145, 308, W13, W14 all within a short walking distance

 About 5 minutes walk from Wanstead Underground Station

 The plan to concentrate the flight paths will have a real impact on places like Bow, Leytonstone, Wanstead and beyond into Redbridge and parts of Havering.  Below is a map from the airport’s consultation document.

London City Airport are consulting on changes they propose to make to flight paths.  They intend to concentrate all the flights over particular areas.  This would have a profound impact on these communities.  Yet few people have been told about the planned changes.

We asked London City if they would organize public meetings in the affected areas but they refused to do so.  We, therefore, have organized a meeting on the issue to which we invite you.

City Airport flight paths map

A letter of objection you can email to City Airport re: its plans to concentrate flight paths

London City Airport is planning to concentrate its flight paths over certain areas.  But it is not telling anybody.  The areas particularly in the line of fire are Bow, Leytonstone, Wanstead, Colliers Row, Dagenham, Hornchurch,  Catford, Dulwich, Brixton, Stockwell and Vauxhall.  It is deeply inequitable.

 Here is a letter you can email to the airport: lamp@londoncityairport.com.  Feel free to adapt it as you wish and to encourage others to also email in.

I strongly object to the way you intend to concentrate the flight paths in and out of London City Airport over particular areas.  It is creating noise ghettos and is deeply unfair.

 I also object to the fact that you are refusing to tell directly the communities that will be affected what is in store for them.  You are holding no public meeting and are doing no leafleting.  Most people don’t even know what is on your website.

If you want to read the full consultation, it is at http://www.londoncityairport.com/londonairspacemanagement.   It started on 4th September and runs until 27th November 2014.

For more detail, read HACAN’s open letter to the airport – http://www.hacaneast.org.uk/?p=493 – and our blog:  http://www.hacaneast.org.uk/?p=491

Open letter to London City Airport

11th October 2014

Dear London City,

Your flight path proposals will have a profound effect – for the worse – on the lives of tens of thousands of Londoners…..and you are simply not telling them.  You are planning to concentrate the planes using the airport on narrow corridors, meaning that the unlucky communities will suffer all the noise.

 It is deeply inequitable.  It reminds me what has happened on the roads.  These days traffic noise these is largely a main road problem.  This is because, over the years, it has been diverted from ‘residential’ roads on to main roads.  It has been concentrated on these main roads.

I wrote in my book Why Noise Matters, published by Earthscan in 2011, “The policy in the UK, and in many other European countries, has been to direct through-traffic away from so-called ‘residential’ roads on to ‘main’ roads.  I would suggest this is deeply inequitable, made more so by the fact that it is the people living on main roads who are less likely to own and drive cars or be able to move away.  They are victims of other people’s noise.”

And now you are proposing to do the same with your planes.  I know you are arguing that the changes are not significant because the planned flight paths are not noticeably different from the current routes.  Tell that to Bow, Leytonstone, Wansted, Catford, Brixton and Vauxhall!  And the other areas that will be under the concentrated flight paths.

Of course, we know you are not going to tell them anything.  You’ve said to us you will not be holding public meetings, or even leafleting the areas.  Your current consultation brings a whole new meaning to the word ‘minimalist’.  You have informed your consultative committee (which you must know is widely seen as one of the weakest and least responsive in the country).  And have put your plans on your website: http://www.londoncityairport.com/content/pdf/LCY-LAMP-Consultation-Document.pdf.   But is thought they you may not even have informed some of the local authorities affected about the proposals.

Now I suspect I know what you are thinking: HACAN is ‘anti-airport’ and is simply jumping on these proposed flight path changes to have a go at the airport.  But that is to miss the point:  the issue here is much deeper than what anybody thinks about the airport.  It is about fairness, equity, treating people properly; concepts that existed long before you began your short life just over 25 years ago.

You are badly failing the fairness test.  You may also be acting contrary to government policy which suggests airports seek to give respite to communities which are overflown.

I suspect you will argue that your minimalist consultation is doing all that the Civil Aviation Authority, which is overseeing the process, requires you to do.  We’ve already raised this with the CAA and will do so again unless you start informing people what’s in store for them.  I urge you to do so.

John Stewart

Chair HACAN East

London City wouldn’t get away with this in Ascot

Press Release

8/10/14 for immediate use

London City wouldn’t get away with it in Ascot

London City Airport has refused to hold public meetings to inform people of the changes it is proposing to its flight paths in its current consultation.  It confirmed to the campaign group HACAN East that it did not intend to hold any meetings.

The Airport is proposing to concentrate aircraft using the airport into much narrower corridors than they use at present (1).  Residents in those areas have not been informed of what is planned.  There has been no door-to-door leafleting.  Areas in the firing line include Bow, Leytonstone, Wanstead, Dagenham and Hornchurch north of the river.  In South London Catford, Dulwich, Brixton, Stockwell and Vauxhall look like being the worst affected.

John Stewart, who chairs HACAN East, said, “There have been big protests recently in villages around Gatwick and in the Home County towns of Ascot and Sunningdale about new flight paths that Gatwick and Heathrow airports have been trialling.  But at least they were only experiments and, in their final plans, both airports are committed to give their residents some respite from the noise.  City Airport, by contrast, is concentrating all its flights over particular areas.  And, to rub salt into the wounds, are not telling residents what’s in store for them.  London City wouldn’t get away with this in Ascot.”

Stewart added, “London City is being disingenuous when it argues that the routes are not changes significantly.  They most certainly are for the people who will get all the planes.”

The consultation started on the 4th September and end on the 27th November.

ENDS

 Notes for editors:

 (1). The key consultation document is http://www.londoncityairport.com/content/pdf/LCY-LAMP-Consultation-Document.pdf .  The maps are indistinct but the main ones to look at are on:

Page 22.  which shows how places like Bow, Leytonstone, Wansted and Colliers Row would be impacted by take-offs on the days the west wind blows (about 75% of the time in a typical year)

Page 23 which shows how places like Dagenham and Hornchurch would be affected by take-offs when an east wind is blowing

Page 33 which shows how places like Catford, Dulwich, Brixton, Stockwell and Vauxhall will be affected by landings during an east wind

For further information:

John Stewart on 0207 737 6641 or 07957385650

 

CAMPAIGNERS CALL ON CAA TO SUSPEND CONSULTATION ON CITY AIRPORT FLIGHT PATHS

Campaign group HACAN East has written to the Civil Aviation Authority to ask it to suspend the current consultation being carried out by London City Airport into flight path changes in East London (2).  HACAN East argues that the tens of thousands of residents who are in line to get more planes if the flight path changes go ahead are not being told about them.  London City is proposing to concentrate the flights taking off from the airport in a narrow corridor.  Areas directly under the favored flight path will be Bow, Hackney Wick, Leyton Midland Road, Leytonstone, Barkingside and Colliers Row.   City Airport is currently consulting on the proposed changes but is not leafleting the areas that will be worst affected (1).

The changes are part of a wider reorganization of the airspace across London and the South East which is been overseen by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).  New computer technology can now guide aircraft much more accurately when they are landing and taking off.  It gives airports the option of varying the routes the planes use in order to give all residents some respite from the noise or of concentrating all the planes on one route.  London City has chosen to concentrate the aircraft.

HACAN East chair John Stewart said, “Quite simply, London City is creating a noise ghetto.  No wonder they are afraid to spell out to the residents what is in store for them. Nobody is telling the residents what will be in store for them.”

Stewart added, “We have written an official letter to the CAA, which oversees the consultation, calling for it to be suspended.

 ENDS

 Notes for Editors:

(1). The consultation documents can be found at http://www.londoncityairport.com/londonairspacemanagement.   It started on 4th September and runs until 27th November 2014.  Responses to the consultation should be emailed to lamp@londoncityairport.com

(2). Letter to the CAA

Dear Sir/Madam,

 I am writing to you to express our concerns about the shortcomings in the current LAMP consultation being carried out by London City Airport.

 We believe they are serious.  The consultation makes it clear that the future flight paths will be concentrated over particular areas yet there is no guarantee in this consultation that the residents who will be impacted will be made aware of this fact and offered the opportunity to respond.

 London City identifies the key stakeholders who are being consulted as “The London City Airport Consultative Committee (ACC) which includes representatives of Local Authorities, community representatives and other organisations that have expressed an interest in the activities of the airport; members of the National Air Traffic Management Committee (NATMAC) which includes representatives of all types of airspace users; airlines that operate from London City Airport”.

 As far as we are aware neither the consultative committee nor the local authorities have plans for a door-to-door leaflet drop to the tens of thousands of residents who will find themselves living under the concentrated flight paths.  We are not even certain it is their job to do so.  It is probably the role of the airport.  We are also not aware of any public meetings being organized in the affected areas.  For example, we believe parts of Leytonstone will be badly affected.  Who has told the residents?

 If your powers allow you to do so, we would urge you to order all stakeholders to be fully consulted during this consultation or to suspend it and require a fresh consultation to take place.

 Yours sincerely,

 John Stewart

Chair HACAN East

London City will create noise ghettos with flight path changes

CAMPAIGNERS ACCUSE LONDON CITY AIRPORT OF CREATING A NOISE GHETTO WITH PROPOSED FLIGHT PATH CHANGES

Campaign group HACAN East has accused City Airport of failing to spell out to tens of thousands of residents in East London that they are in line to get many more planes overhead if proposed flight path changes go ahead.  London City is proposing to concentrate the flights taking off from the airport in a narrow corridor.  Areas directly under the favored flight path will be Bow, Hackney Wick, Leyton Midland Road, Leytonstone, Barkingside and Colliers Row.   City Airport is currently consulting on the proposed changes but is not leafleting the areas that will be worst affected (1).

The changes are part of a wider reorganization of the airspace across London and the South East which is been overseen by the CAA (Civil Aviation Authority).  New computer technology can now guide aircraft much more accurately when they are landing and taking off.  It gives airports the option of varying the routes the planes use in order to give all residents some respite from the noise or of concentrating all the planes on one route.  London City has chosen to concentrate the aircraft.

HACAN East chair John Stewart said, “Quite simply, London City is creating a noise ghetto.  No wonder they are afraid to spell out to the residents what is in store for them.  The contrast with Heathrow couldn’t be more marked.  They are planning to consult widely on the changes and to use the new technology to share out the noise burden.”

Stewart added, “We will be officially reporting London City to the CAA because of the poor quality of their consultation.  They simply have not made clear to people what is in store for them.”

(1). The consultation documents can be found at http://www.londoncityairport.com/londonairspacemanagement.   It started on 4th September and runs until 27th November 2014.  Responses to the consultation should be emailed to lamp@londoncityairport.com

 

 

London City to consult on flight paths

TRANSLATION PLEASE!

London City Airport are to consult on flight paths.  Below is what is on their website.  More may emerge on 4th September but our only comment right now is: translation please! 

From London City Website:

From 4 September to 27 November 2014 London City Airport (LCY) is consulting on proposals to modernise its flight paths, to allow the introduction of Area Navigation (RNAV), superseding the ground-based navigational systems used today.  The consultation is a statutory requirement according to Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) regulations.

The London City Airport proposal seeks to replicate the existing conventional flight paths with equivalent RNAV routes.  The concept is not optional – a legal mandate is being introduced by the Civil Aviation Authority which will require all aircraft to be equipped to navigate using RNAV by November 2017, and a mandate for the airspace to provide RNAV routes is expected to be effective by winter 2019. 

The proposed changes are key to achieving network efficiency and reducing delays in the south and are an important part of the London Airspace Management Programme (LAMP), NATS’ wider programme to modernise the air route system over London and the south east.

Eye-catching demo at London City Airport

How the Newham Recorder reported the demo on Monday 21st July

Protesters fighting against the proposed £200m expansion of London City Airport staged a silent protest in the main terminal.

The 15-strong group of residents and members of climate change campaign The Future strategically postioned themselves to gain maximum impact.

One by one the group drew The Future’s symbol of a thick circle around their right eyes before watching passengers and staff for half an hour.

Tamsin Omond: “The numbers weren’t as big as we’d have liked, but we were still able to make an impact.

“They closed a section of the airport of so people had to go past us so we really engaged with those around us, although we didn’t get the warmest of receptions from everyone.”

Plans to extend the airport to accommodate an extra 50,000 flights a year and double passenger numbers are currently being considered by Newham Council.

Check out the video:

http://youtu.be/n9RlrCBY8bE

Breaking news:  Newham Council will not now hear London City's application for expansion until the Autumn.  Exact date to be finalised.

London City Airport residents face up to 7 years of construction noise

PRESS RELEASE – LONDON CITY AIRPORT RESIDENTS FACE UP TO 7 YEARS OF NIGHT TIME CONSTRUCTION WORK.

July 1st 2014

For Immediate Release

London City Airport residents face up to 7 years of Night Time Construction work.

Newham Council have warned London City Airport that the impacts of night time construction work may see them refuse planning permission for their new Development. [1]

London City Airport’s current Development planning application will see construction work carried out over a 7 year period, including 3 years of full 24 hour work, where noise intensive construction activities like piling will occur at night.

Newham Council have found that the resulting noise impacts are considerable and would significantly impact on residents in North Woolwich. North Woolwich residents currently suffer from the Airports operational noise as well as construction noise from Crossrail. Further construction work like the Chinese ABP development could also see them impacted.

London City Airport is not willing to temporarily alter its business operations to facilitate construction at it’s own development and have submitted noise mitigation measures which Newham Council have rejected.

 

Ends

More details at www.stopcityairportmasterplan.tumblr.com